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Crimes of the Educators book coverBook Review

Crimes of the Educators

How Utopians Are Using Government Schools
to Destroy America's Children

by Samuel Blumenfeld and Alex Newman,
WND Books, Washington, D.C. Copyright © 2014

This is the last of ten books on education in America by Samuel Blumenfeld, who died in June of 2015. The thrust of his writing is clearly [The authors] claim that beginning with John Dewey in 1898, our public schools have been hijacked to produce a socialistic mindset in the population, as opposed to a strong and capable sense of individual responsibility and achievement.evident in the title. He was critical primarily of “government schools,” but Christian educators will find value in determining whether some of his charges may apply to our programs as well.

Co-author Alex Newman is the president of Liberty Sentinel Media, Inc. and has written for a large variety of publications. He has also taught advanced economics to seniors in a classical K-12 school.

American schools, especially our public schools, rank surprisingly low among the educational systems of the world. The authors lay the responsibility for the poor showing upon the leaders in American education over the years and upon government involvement. They claim that beginning with John Dewey in 1898, our public schools have been hijacked to produce a socialistic mindset in the population, as opposed to a strong and capable sense of individual responsibility and achievement.

The book accuses our public educational system of six different “crimes.” The first of these is a deliberate “dumbing down” of America. In part, this is said to be a result of the abandonment of the phonics approach in teaching reading, in favor of “whole word” methodology. They cite this change also as a significant cause of the rise in dyslexia, ADD, and ADHD in America’s children.

“The steep decline of Christianity in America can be directly attributed to the public schools, which have become the parochial schools of atheism.”Of special interest to Christian educators, the book charges that the decline in morals and behavior in our nation is primarily a result of the failure of our public schools. “The steep decline of Christianity in America can be directly attributed to the public schools, which have become the parochial schools of atheism.” (p. 201)

Some portions of the book are not as relevant for Christian educators. But a Christian teacher or a Christian faculty have much to gain from considering and discussing these basic issues. To what extent have we perhaps been a part of the “dumbing down” and other “crimes”? What can we learn from a study of these “crimes” that can help us to strengthen and improve Christian education?

Parents are learning that they can no longer assume that the public schools will provide the learnings and understandings needed for a joyful and fruitful life for their children. Therefore, a growing number of parents are assuming the responsibility for educating their children at home. Others are looking to charter schools, classical schools, and Christian schools of all types for the answers to their needs. And the results are encouraging, in comparison with the typical public schools.

Let us give serious thought and prayer to the ongoing study of our own goals and methods of instruction in Christian education, so that we can help to undergird our nation once again with a godly foundation for the future.

Martin Barlau has devoted his life to Christian education as a teacher, principal, consultant, and author.